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Българският форум за музиканти

Parni_Valjak

История на звукозаписа (http://www.historyofrecording.com/)

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Fabulous BEAUTY


 


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The subsequent images are of the radical 4-track tape recorder Studer J-37, used on the Beatles album St. Pepper , recorded at Abbey Road Studios in London. This machine, the "workhorse of the 60" was used a few years ago to remaster the Beatles recordings.

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THE WAY IT WAS


 


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How Verve Records Got Gutted

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    g9iT3DH.jpg Ted GioiaMarch,14, 2015
 
   The record label of Billie Holiday and Ella Fitzgerald just got swallowed by a hip-hop business… and no one even noticed!

The announcement could hardly have been hidden any better. Slipping the news into the second paragraph of a press release about a management change, Universal Music disclosed last week that most of the day-to-day responsibility for the once great Verve label has been absorbed by its hip-hop and pop operations. Interscope Geffen A&M, the home of Eminem and Lady Gaga, “is now responsible for Verve’s sales, marketing and film and TV licensing.”

 

   What a strange turn of events! Interscope, founded in 1989 by Jimmy Iovine, first made its mark in the music world as the in-your-face label of gangsta rappers—although later corporate moves have broadened its catalog to include a range of pop and rock acts. Verve, in contrast, started out as a posh home for jazz stars who played the classic songs of George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Cole Porter, and other craftsman tunesmiths of the Golden Age of America popular music. Even the most optimistic jazz fan must cringe at the prospects of a shotgun marriage between these different organizations with their contrasting traditions.

 

   My sources tell me that the organizational shake-up took place quietly some weeks back. David Foster, head of Verve, is still in place, and can rely on newly-appointed general manager Mike Rittberg to help him maintain some independence for the label. But the rank and file of the Verve team have been dismissed. The sales and marketing push behind whatever remains of Verve’s jazz mission—if anything—will be handled by the same folks who are pushing Maroon 5 and Imagine Dragons. Anyone want to guess how much they care about jazz?

Oh, yes, in the fourth paragraph of the press release, we learn that Verve will “redevelop its brand in the coming year.” I think this is corporate speak for “we don’t quite know what we are doing.”

 

   Frankly, I am not surprised at this turn of events. Norman Granz, who founded Verve Records in 1956, would be horrified by the recent history of his iconic label. Granz worked with most of the major jazz artists of the middle decades of the 20th century. At one time or another, Granz recorded Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Art Tatum, Stan Getz, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Count Basie, Oscar Peterson and dozens of other now legendary jazz figures.

What would Granz think of Verve’s Donny Osmond album “tracing the high and low points of both his professional and personal life”? Or the recent Barry Manilow album on Verve, which finds the pop crooner collaborating with a host of dead musicians? It’s a long path from Billie Holiday to Donny Osmond, and the trajectory is definitely downward.

 

   It’s a long path from Billie Holiday to Donny Osmond, and the trajectory is definitely downward.

Granz was a tenacious businessman, but he also knew that some things were more important than money. He fought against racial discrimination at every juncture, and refused to compromise in situations where others would have folded. He once confronted an armed policeman trying to plant drugs in Ella Fitzgerald’s dressing room. “I ought to kill you,” threatened the cop, who pointed a gun at the producer’s stomach. Granz responded, “Well, if you’re going to shoot me, I mean, shoot me.” Granz showed similar courage when insisting that a taxi driver operating a “whites only” vehicle give a ride to Fitzgerald, or tearing down the signs for white and black patrons at a jazz concert. Nat Hentoff has called Granz the '”the most stubborn and brusque man I have never known”—but only someone with such fierce determination could have overcome the obstacles facing a music impresario committed to civil rights in the ’40s and ’50s.

 

   Verve would benefit today from someone with Granz’s vision and stubbornness. As I look back at Verve’s output in recent years, the most striking aspect is the lack of any consistent guiding principles. Some albums are better than others, but too many decisions seem driven by marketing concepts rather than a commitment to artistry. Even Diana Krall, one of the few high caliber jazz artists still affiliated with Verve, is presented in the crassest way. Her 2012 release, Glad Rag Doll,looked more like an excuse for a lingerie photo shoot than a jazz album. Her latest recording, Wallflower, has a few inspired musical moments, but the focus on tired top 40 pop material from a second-rate oldies playlist—“Alone Again (Naturally),” “Desperado,” “I’m Not in Love”—is cheesy in the extreme. Krall succeeds here despite the song choices; a lesser artist might have lost all credibility in jazz circles with an album of this sort.

 
   How could Universal fix Verve? Perhaps they should look back to the steps Norman Granz took to revitalize Ella Fitzgerald’s career in the ’50s—the greatest success story in the history of the Verve label. While under contract to Decca (ironically, now part of the Universal Music empire that controls Verve), she was prodded into recording embarrassing songs such as “Santa Claus Got Stuck in My Chimney” and “Little Man in a Flying Saucer.” But when Granz brought her on board the new Verve label, he packaged and promoted her as the leading jazz interpreter of classic American songs. The resulting “Songbook” albums—featuring the music of George Gershwin, Cole Porter, Duke Ellington and others composers of the highest caliber—still serve as the foundation of Verve’s catalog and reputation.
 

   That kind of commitment to quality is still the best recipe for long-term success in the jazz field. Throw out the gimmicks. Forget about clever press releases. Instead, back the finest talent and give them a platform to make the best music possible. If Universal Music wants to see how this is done, they should check out the jazz offerings from ECM, Nonesuch, and other labels that have flourished, even during tough times, with a commitment to artistry that starts at the top of the organization.

 

   Or, if that is too much to ask from the new team at Interscope, perhaps the best thing for all parties would be to find a new owner for this historic label. Maybe with a different boss, Verve could once again live up to promise embodied by its name. 

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Може би най-типичният пример за този метод, за който се сещам винаги е гениалното интро на парчето "Money" от "The Dark Side Of The Moon" на Флойд. Нещо, което сега се прави за секунди софтуерно в онези дни, когато е нямало нито семплери, нито компютри, е коствало много време и главоболия - особено да се получи в конкретният нестандартен размер (7/4). В конкретния случай "изработката" със рязане и лепене на парчетата е била изцяло заслуга на Р. Уотърс, а крайната дължина на лентата е била около 6 метра и е било много трудно да бъде просвирвана, но...както виждаме там където едни биха се отказали - други постигат невъзможното. :)

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On July 8, 1954, radio jock Dewey Phillips of Memphis' WHBQ radio played a new song, "That's All Right (Mama)," and its flip side, "Blue Moon of Kentucky," on his "Red Hot & Blue" R&B show.

An instant hit, the song was immediately played 14 more times. Callers to the station insisted that the singer, a local boy named Elvis Presley, must be a black man. Elvis knew of the airplay in advance, so he hid out at a local movie show, not knowing what the response would be to his music. It was so well received that Dewey tracked him down for a live radio interview later that evening.

Elvis went public, 61 years ago today. To say it was the start of something big would be an understatement.

Edited by Parni_Valjak
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Понеже от началото на месеца най-голямото студио в БНР ( а може би и на балканите) - Студио 1, влезе в планов ремонт при който ще бъдат сменени захабения под, както и целият кабелаж, ми се стори полезно да снимам и кача няколко снимки да се види как е изглеждала конструкцията на плаващия под след прострояването му през 1942-ра. До колкото знам проекта на цялата сграда  и студийните помещения е бил на немски специалисти. Опитах се да покажа на снимките фундаментите на пода, еластичните подложки, гредите, дървените плоскости на които е било наковано старото дюшеме, както и кабелните канали и шахти.:

 

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Ако някой все пак иска да види и чуе наживо истински съхранен и работещ 4-канален, лампов Studer J37  - може да посети музея на история на радиото, намиращ се на ул. "Московска" в журналистическият факултет на СУ, "Климент Охридски"- ето няколко снимки на които се виждат и два други стереомагнетофона Studer и Nagra T-Audio:

 

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Благодарности за внасянето на дух на професионализъм и отношение (манталитет) във форума!

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A Look at the Tefifon, Germany's Doomed 1950s Music Player 

 

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After World War II, people in the U.S. started buying vinyl and record players more than ever before. But over in West Germany, another music player took off: the Tefifon.

Invented in the 1930s by a German engineer named Karl Daniel, the Tefifon is like a mash-up of several obsolete music technologies. Like an 8-track, it plays a cartridge. Unlike the 8-track, a Tefifon cartridge— called, adorably, a “Tefi”— is not magnetic. It actually works more like a record player, since the Tefifon reads these cartridges by pressing a stylus to deep plastic grooves. And like a Minidisc player, the Tefifon is now almost impressively obsolete.

Even though it never really made it out of West Germany, the Tefifon was a legit audio player at the time. Bigger cartridges held around four hours of music, and sound quality was better than shellac records. Then again, it was not as good as vinyl, and as the 1950s died down, so did the short-lived audio player. The Tefifon plant closed down in 1965. If they ever do a German reboot of Mad Men, this is one period detail they could get right for the early seasons. You can still buy vintage tefifons on Ebay.

Edited by Parni_Valjak
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Въобще не можах да позная Шер, макар, че е написано...:) :

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhTjLy_LTcA&utm_content=buffera6d4a&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

 

 

И отново  спомени от Sound City : 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezne0KIM9h4

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